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The Resource Climate change : biological and human aspects, Jonathan Cowie

Climate change : biological and human aspects, Jonathan Cowie

Label
Climate change : biological and human aspects
Title
Climate change
Title remainder
biological and human aspects
Statement of responsibility
Jonathan Cowie
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
UKM
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cowie, Jonathan
Dewey number
  • 363.73874
  • 551.6
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
QC981.8.C5
LC item number
C766 2007
Literary form
non fiction
NAL call number
QC981.8.C5
NAL item number
C766 2007
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Climatic changes
  • Climatic changes
Label
Climate change : biological and human aspects, Jonathan Cowie
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. An introduction to climate change -- 1.1. Weather or climate -- 1.2. The greenhouse effect -- 1.3. The carbon cycle -- 1.4. Natural changes in the carbon cycle -- 1.5. Pacemaker of the glacial-interglacial cycles -- 1.6. Non-greenhouse influences on climate -- 1.7. The water cycle, climate change and biology -- 1.8. From theory to reality -- 1.9. References -- 2. Principal indicators of past climates -- 2.1. Terrestrial biotic climatic proxies -- 2.1.1. Tree-ring analysis (dendrochronology) -- 2.1.2. Isotopic dendrochronology -- 2.1.3. Leaf shape (morphology) -- 2.1.4. Leaf physiology -- 2.1.5. Pollen and spore analysis -- 2.1.6. Species as climate proxies -- 2.2. Marine biotic climatic proxies -- 2.2.1. 18O isotope analysis of forams and corals -- 2.2.2. Alkenone analysis -- 2.3. Non-biotic indicators -- 2.3.1. Isotopic analysis of water -- 2.3.2. Boreholes -- 2.3.3. Carbon dioxide and methane records as palaeoclimatic forcing agents -- 2.3.4. Dust as an indicator of dry-wet hemispheric climates -- 2.4. Other indicators -- 2.5. Interpreting indicators -- 2.6. Conclusions -- 2.7. References --
  • 3. Past climate change -- 3.1. Early biology and climate of the Hadean and Archeaen eons (4.6-2.5 billion years ago, bya) -- 3.1.1. The pre-biotic Earth (4.6-3.8 bya) -- 3.1.2. The early biotic Earth (3.8-2.3 bya) -- 3.2. Major bio-climatic events of the Proterozoic eon (2.5-0.542 bya) -- 3.2.1. Earth in the anaerobic-aerobic transition (2.6-1.7 bya) -- 3.2.2. The aerobic Earth (from 1.7 bya) -- 3.3. Major bio-climatic events of the pre-Quaternary Phanerozoic (540-2 mya) -- 3.3.1. Late-Ordovician extinction (455-435 mya) -- 3.3.2. Late-Devonian extinction (365-363.5 mya) -- 3.3.3. Vascular plants and the atmospheric depletion of carbon dioxide (250-275 mya) -- 3.3.4. Permo-Carboniferous glaciation (330-250 mya) -- 3.3.5. End-Permian extinction (251 mya) -- 3.3.6. End-Triassic extinction (205 mya) -- 3.3.7. Toarcian (early (late lower) Jurassic) extinction (183 mya) -- 3.3.8. Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction (65.5 mya) -- 3.3.9. Eocene climatic maximum (55-54.8 mya) -- 3.3.10. Eocene-Oligocene extinction (approximately 35 mya ; or 33.9 mya?) -- 3.3.11. Late Miocene expansion of C4?grasses (14-9 mya) -- 3.4. Summary -- 3.5. References --
  • 4. The Oligocene to the Quaternary : climate and biology -- 4.1. The Oligocene (33.9-23.03 mya) -- 4.2. The end Miocene (9-5.3 mya) -- 4.3. The Pliocene (5.3-1.8 mya) -- 4.4. The current ice age -- 4.5. The last glacial -- 4.5.1. Overview of temperature, carbon dioxide and timing -- 4.5.2. Ice and sea level -- 4.5.3. Temperature changes within the glacial -- 4.5.4. Biological and environmental impacts of the last glacial -- 4.6. Interglacials and the present climate -- 4.6.1. Previous interglacials -- 4.6.2. The Allerød, Bølling and Younger Dryas (14 600-11 600 years ago) -- 4.6.3. The Holocene (11 500 years ago, the Industrial Revolution) -- 4.6.4. Biological response to the last glacial, LGM and Holocene transition -- 4.7. Summary -- 4.8. References --
  • 5. Present climate and biological change -- 5.1. Recent climate change -- 5.1.1. The latter half of the Little Ice Age -- 5.1.2. Twentieth-century climate -- 5.1.3. Twenty-first-century climate -- 5.1.4. The Holocene interglacial beyond the twenty-first century -- 5.1.5. Holocene summary -- 5.2. Human change arising from the Holocene climate -- 5.2.1. Climatic impacts on early human civilisations -- 5.2.2. The Little Ice Age's human impact -- 5.2.3. Increasing twentieth-century human climatic insulation -- 5.3. Climate and business as usual in the twenty-first century -- 5.3.1. IPCC business as usual -- 5.3.2. Uncertainties and the IPCC's conclusions -- 5.4. Current human influences on the carbon cycle -- 5.4.1. Carbon dioxide -- 5.4.2. Methane -- 5.4.3. Halocarbons -- 5.4.4. Nitrous oxide -- 5.5. References --
  • 6. Current warming and likely future impacts -- 6.1. Current biological symptoms of warming -- 6.1.1. Current boreal dendrochronological response -- 6.1.2. Current tropical-rainforest response -- 6.1.3. Some biological dimensions of the climatic-change fingerprint -- 6.1.4. Phenology -- 6.1.5. Biological communities and species shift -- 6.2. Case study : climate and natural systems in the USA -- 6.3. Case study : climate and natural systems in the UK -- 6.4. Biological response to greenhouse trends beyond the twenty-first century -- 6.5. Possible surprise responses to greenhouse trends in the twenty-first century and beyond -- 6.5.1. Extreme weather events -- 6.5.2. Greenhouse gases -- 6.5.3. Sea-level rise -- 6.5.4. Methane hydrates (methane clathrates) -- 6.5.5. Volcanoes -- 6.5.6. Oceanic and atmospheric circulation -- 6.5.7. Ocean acidity -- 6.5.8. The probability of surprises -- 6.6. References --
  • 7. The human ecology of climate change -- 7.1. Population (past, present and future) and its environmental impact -- 7.1.1. Population and environmental impact -- 7.1.2. Past and present population -- 7.1.3. Future population -- 7.1.4. Food -- 7.1.5. Impact on other species -- 7.2. Energy supply -- 7.2.1. Energy supply, the historical context -- 7.2.2. Future energy supply -- 7.3. Human health and climate change -- 7.3.1. Health and weather extremes -- 7.3.2. Climate change and disease -- 7.3.3. Flooding and health -- 7.3.4. Droughts -- 7.4. Climate change and food security -- 7.4.1. Past and present food security -- 7.4.2. Future food security and climate change -- 7.5. The biology of reducing anthropogenic climate change -- 7.5.1. Terrestrial photosynthesis and soil carbon -- 7.5.2. Manipulating marine photosynthesis -- 7.5.3. Biofuels -- 7.6. Summary and conclusions -- 7.7. References --
  • 8. Sustainability and policy -- 8.1. Key developments of sustainability policy -- 8.1.1. UN Conference on the Human Environment (1972) -- 8.1.2. The Club of Rome's Limits to Growth (1972) -- 8.1.3. World Climate Conference (1979) -- 8.1.4. The World Conservation Strategy (1980 ) -- 8.1.5. The Brandt Report, Common Crisis North-South (1890) -- 8.1.6. The Brundtland, World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) -- 8.1.7. United Nations' Conference on the Environment and Development, Rio de Janeiro (1992) -- 8.1.8. The Kyoto Protocol (1997) -- 8.1.9. Johannesburg Summit, UNCED+10 (2002) -- 8.1.10. Post 2002 -- 8.2. Energy sustainability and carbon (global) -- 8.2.1. Prospects for savings from changes in land use -- 8.2.2. Prospects for savings from improvements in energy efficiency -- 8.2.3. Prospects for fossil-carbon savings from renewable energy -- 8.2.4. Prospects of carbon-capture technology -- 8.2.5. Prospects for nuclear options -- 8.2.6. Overall prospects for fossil-carbon savings to 2025 -- 8.3. Energy policy and carbon -- 8.3.1. Case history : USA -- 8.3.2. Case history : UK -- 8.3.3. Case history : China and India -- 8.4. Possible future energy options -- 8.4.1. Managing fossil-carbon emissions, the scale of the problem -- 8.4.2. Fossil futures -- 8.4.3. Nuclear futures -- 8.4.4. Renewable futures -- 8.4.5. Low-energy futures -- 8.4.6. Possible future energy options and greenhouse gases -- 8.5. Future human and biological change -- 8.5.1. The ease and difficulty of adapting to future impacts -- 8.5.2. Future climate change and human health -- 8.5.3. Future climate and human-ecology implication for wildlife -- 8.5.4. Reducing future anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions -- 8.5.5. A final conclusion -- 8.6. References --
  • Appendix 1. Glossary and abbreviations -- Glossary -- Abbreviations -- Appendix 2. Bio-geological chronology -- Appendix 3. Calculations of energy demand/supply and orders of magnitude -- Calculations of energy demand/supply -- Orders of magnitude -- Sources -- Appendix 4. The IPCC 2007 report
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
xvi, 487 p.
Isbn
9780521696197
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2007299660
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill., maps
System control number
  • ocn123113793
  • (OCoLC)123113793
Label
Climate change : biological and human aspects, Jonathan Cowie
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. An introduction to climate change -- 1.1. Weather or climate -- 1.2. The greenhouse effect -- 1.3. The carbon cycle -- 1.4. Natural changes in the carbon cycle -- 1.5. Pacemaker of the glacial-interglacial cycles -- 1.6. Non-greenhouse influences on climate -- 1.7. The water cycle, climate change and biology -- 1.8. From theory to reality -- 1.9. References -- 2. Principal indicators of past climates -- 2.1. Terrestrial biotic climatic proxies -- 2.1.1. Tree-ring analysis (dendrochronology) -- 2.1.2. Isotopic dendrochronology -- 2.1.3. Leaf shape (morphology) -- 2.1.4. Leaf physiology -- 2.1.5. Pollen and spore analysis -- 2.1.6. Species as climate proxies -- 2.2. Marine biotic climatic proxies -- 2.2.1. 18O isotope analysis of forams and corals -- 2.2.2. Alkenone analysis -- 2.3. Non-biotic indicators -- 2.3.1. Isotopic analysis of water -- 2.3.2. Boreholes -- 2.3.3. Carbon dioxide and methane records as palaeoclimatic forcing agents -- 2.3.4. Dust as an indicator of dry-wet hemispheric climates -- 2.4. Other indicators -- 2.5. Interpreting indicators -- 2.6. Conclusions -- 2.7. References --
  • 3. Past climate change -- 3.1. Early biology and climate of the Hadean and Archeaen eons (4.6-2.5 billion years ago, bya) -- 3.1.1. The pre-biotic Earth (4.6-3.8 bya) -- 3.1.2. The early biotic Earth (3.8-2.3 bya) -- 3.2. Major bio-climatic events of the Proterozoic eon (2.5-0.542 bya) -- 3.2.1. Earth in the anaerobic-aerobic transition (2.6-1.7 bya) -- 3.2.2. The aerobic Earth (from 1.7 bya) -- 3.3. Major bio-climatic events of the pre-Quaternary Phanerozoic (540-2 mya) -- 3.3.1. Late-Ordovician extinction (455-435 mya) -- 3.3.2. Late-Devonian extinction (365-363.5 mya) -- 3.3.3. Vascular plants and the atmospheric depletion of carbon dioxide (250-275 mya) -- 3.3.4. Permo-Carboniferous glaciation (330-250 mya) -- 3.3.5. End-Permian extinction (251 mya) -- 3.3.6. End-Triassic extinction (205 mya) -- 3.3.7. Toarcian (early (late lower) Jurassic) extinction (183 mya) -- 3.3.8. Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction (65.5 mya) -- 3.3.9. Eocene climatic maximum (55-54.8 mya) -- 3.3.10. Eocene-Oligocene extinction (approximately 35 mya ; or 33.9 mya?) -- 3.3.11. Late Miocene expansion of C4?grasses (14-9 mya) -- 3.4. Summary -- 3.5. References --
  • 4. The Oligocene to the Quaternary : climate and biology -- 4.1. The Oligocene (33.9-23.03 mya) -- 4.2. The end Miocene (9-5.3 mya) -- 4.3. The Pliocene (5.3-1.8 mya) -- 4.4. The current ice age -- 4.5. The last glacial -- 4.5.1. Overview of temperature, carbon dioxide and timing -- 4.5.2. Ice and sea level -- 4.5.3. Temperature changes within the glacial -- 4.5.4. Biological and environmental impacts of the last glacial -- 4.6. Interglacials and the present climate -- 4.6.1. Previous interglacials -- 4.6.2. The Allerød, Bølling and Younger Dryas (14 600-11 600 years ago) -- 4.6.3. The Holocene (11 500 years ago, the Industrial Revolution) -- 4.6.4. Biological response to the last glacial, LGM and Holocene transition -- 4.7. Summary -- 4.8. References --
  • 5. Present climate and biological change -- 5.1. Recent climate change -- 5.1.1. The latter half of the Little Ice Age -- 5.1.2. Twentieth-century climate -- 5.1.3. Twenty-first-century climate -- 5.1.4. The Holocene interglacial beyond the twenty-first century -- 5.1.5. Holocene summary -- 5.2. Human change arising from the Holocene climate -- 5.2.1. Climatic impacts on early human civilisations -- 5.2.2. The Little Ice Age's human impact -- 5.2.3. Increasing twentieth-century human climatic insulation -- 5.3. Climate and business as usual in the twenty-first century -- 5.3.1. IPCC business as usual -- 5.3.2. Uncertainties and the IPCC's conclusions -- 5.4. Current human influences on the carbon cycle -- 5.4.1. Carbon dioxide -- 5.4.2. Methane -- 5.4.3. Halocarbons -- 5.4.4. Nitrous oxide -- 5.5. References --
  • 6. Current warming and likely future impacts -- 6.1. Current biological symptoms of warming -- 6.1.1. Current boreal dendrochronological response -- 6.1.2. Current tropical-rainforest response -- 6.1.3. Some biological dimensions of the climatic-change fingerprint -- 6.1.4. Phenology -- 6.1.5. Biological communities and species shift -- 6.2. Case study : climate and natural systems in the USA -- 6.3. Case study : climate and natural systems in the UK -- 6.4. Biological response to greenhouse trends beyond the twenty-first century -- 6.5. Possible surprise responses to greenhouse trends in the twenty-first century and beyond -- 6.5.1. Extreme weather events -- 6.5.2. Greenhouse gases -- 6.5.3. Sea-level rise -- 6.5.4. Methane hydrates (methane clathrates) -- 6.5.5. Volcanoes -- 6.5.6. Oceanic and atmospheric circulation -- 6.5.7. Ocean acidity -- 6.5.8. The probability of surprises -- 6.6. References --
  • 7. The human ecology of climate change -- 7.1. Population (past, present and future) and its environmental impact -- 7.1.1. Population and environmental impact -- 7.1.2. Past and present population -- 7.1.3. Future population -- 7.1.4. Food -- 7.1.5. Impact on other species -- 7.2. Energy supply -- 7.2.1. Energy supply, the historical context -- 7.2.2. Future energy supply -- 7.3. Human health and climate change -- 7.3.1. Health and weather extremes -- 7.3.2. Climate change and disease -- 7.3.3. Flooding and health -- 7.3.4. Droughts -- 7.4. Climate change and food security -- 7.4.1. Past and present food security -- 7.4.2. Future food security and climate change -- 7.5. The biology of reducing anthropogenic climate change -- 7.5.1. Terrestrial photosynthesis and soil carbon -- 7.5.2. Manipulating marine photosynthesis -- 7.5.3. Biofuels -- 7.6. Summary and conclusions -- 7.7. References --
  • 8. Sustainability and policy -- 8.1. Key developments of sustainability policy -- 8.1.1. UN Conference on the Human Environment (1972) -- 8.1.2. The Club of Rome's Limits to Growth (1972) -- 8.1.3. World Climate Conference (1979) -- 8.1.4. The World Conservation Strategy (1980 ) -- 8.1.5. The Brandt Report, Common Crisis North-South (1890) -- 8.1.6. The Brundtland, World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) -- 8.1.7. United Nations' Conference on the Environment and Development, Rio de Janeiro (1992) -- 8.1.8. The Kyoto Protocol (1997) -- 8.1.9. Johannesburg Summit, UNCED+10 (2002) -- 8.1.10. Post 2002 -- 8.2. Energy sustainability and carbon (global) -- 8.2.1. Prospects for savings from changes in land use -- 8.2.2. Prospects for savings from improvements in energy efficiency -- 8.2.3. Prospects for fossil-carbon savings from renewable energy -- 8.2.4. Prospects of carbon-capture technology -- 8.2.5. Prospects for nuclear options -- 8.2.6. Overall prospects for fossil-carbon savings to 2025 -- 8.3. Energy policy and carbon -- 8.3.1. Case history : USA -- 8.3.2. Case history : UK -- 8.3.3. Case history : China and India -- 8.4. Possible future energy options -- 8.4.1. Managing fossil-carbon emissions, the scale of the problem -- 8.4.2. Fossil futures -- 8.4.3. Nuclear futures -- 8.4.4. Renewable futures -- 8.4.5. Low-energy futures -- 8.4.6. Possible future energy options and greenhouse gases -- 8.5. Future human and biological change -- 8.5.1. The ease and difficulty of adapting to future impacts -- 8.5.2. Future climate change and human health -- 8.5.3. Future climate and human-ecology implication for wildlife -- 8.5.4. Reducing future anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions -- 8.5.5. A final conclusion -- 8.6. References --
  • Appendix 1. Glossary and abbreviations -- Glossary -- Abbreviations -- Appendix 2. Bio-geological chronology -- Appendix 3. Calculations of energy demand/supply and orders of magnitude -- Calculations of energy demand/supply -- Orders of magnitude -- Sources -- Appendix 4. The IPCC 2007 report
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
xvi, 487 p.
Isbn
9780521696197
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2007299660
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill., maps
System control number
  • ocn123113793
  • (OCoLC)123113793

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