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The Resource The American Revolution : writings from the pamphlet debate, II, 1773-1776, Gordon S. Wood, editor

The American Revolution : writings from the pamphlet debate, II, 1773-1776, Gordon S. Wood, editor

Label
The American Revolution : writings from the pamphlet debate, II, 1773-1776
Title
The American Revolution
Title remainder
writings from the pamphlet debate
Title number
II
Title part
1773-1776
Statement of responsibility
Gordon S. Wood, editor
Title variation
  • Writings from the pamphlet debate, 1773-1776
  • Writings from the pamphlet debate
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"For the 250th anniversary of the start of the American Revolution, the leading historian of the era presents a landmark two-volume edition of the thirty-nine pamphlets charting the course of the political crisis that led to independence. This second volume includes twenty works from the crucial years when the debate turned from issues of representation and consent to the fateful question of where sovereignty would ultimately reside in the British Empire"--
Member of
Assigning source
Back cover
Cataloging source
YDXCP
Dewey number
973.3
Index
index present
LC call number
E203
LC item number
.A5787 2015 vol.2
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
The library of America
Series volume
266
Label
The American Revolution : writings from the pamphlet debate, II, 1773-1776, Gordon S. Wood, editor
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • A letter from a Virginian, to the members of the Congress to be held at Philadelphia, on the first of September, 1774. New York, 1774
  • [Jonathan Boucher?]
  • The Congress canvassed: or, an examination into the conduct of the delegates, at their grand convention, held in Philadelphia, Sept. 1, 1774. Addressed, to the merchants of New-York. New York, 1774
  • [Samuel Seabury]
  • A friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on the subject of our political confusions: in which the necessary consequences of violently opposing the King's troops, and of a general non-importation are fairly stated. New York, 1774
  • [Thomas Bradbury Chandler]
  • The other side of the question: or, a defence of the liberties of North-America. In answer to a late friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on the subject of our political confusions. New York, 1774
  • [Philip Livingston]
  • "An appendix, stating the heavy grievances the colonies labour under from several late Acts of the British Parliament, and shewing what we have just reason to expect the consequences of these measures will be." From Samuel Sherwood, A sermon containing, scriptural instructions to civil rulers, and all free-born subjects. New haven, 1774
  • Ebenezer Baldwin
  • The speeches of His Excellency Governor Hutchinson, to the General Assembly of the Massachusetts-Bay. At a session begun and held on the sixth of January, 1773. With the answers of His Majesty's Council and the House of Representatives respectively. Boston, 1773
  • Strictures on a pamphlet, entitled, a "Friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on the subject of our political confusions." Addressed to the people of America. The second edition. New London, 1775
  • [Charles Lee]
  • The strictures on the friendly address examined, and a refutation of its principles attempted. Addressed to the people of America. Boston, 1775
  • [Henry Barry]
  • A candid examination of the mutual claims of Great-Britain, and the colonies: with a plan of accommodation, on constitutional principles. New York, 1775
  • [Joseph Galloway]
  • Taxation no tyranny; an answer to the resolutions and address of the American Congress. London, 1775
  • [Samuel Johnson]
  • An answer to a pamphlet, entitled taxation no tyranny. Addressed to the author, and to persons in power. London, 1775
  • The speech of Edmund Burke, Esquire, on moving his resolutions for conciliation with the colonies, March 22d, 1775. New York, 1775
  • A summary view of the rights of British America. Set forth in some resolutions intended for the inspection of the present delegates of the people of Virginia. Now in convention. Williamsburg, 1774
  • Edmund Burke
  • America's appeal to the impartial world. Hartford, 1775
  • [Moses Mather]
  • Common sense; addressed to the inhabitants of America ... A new edition, with several additions in the body of the work. To which is added an appendix; together with an address to the people called Quakers. Philadelphia, 1776
  • [Thomas Paine] --The true interest of America impartially stated, in certain strictures on a pamphlet intitled Common Sense. Philadelphia, 1776
  • [Charles Inglis]
  • Strictures upon the Declaration of the Congress at Philadelphia; in a letter to a noble lord &c. London, 1776
  • [Thomas Hutchinson]
  • [Thomas Jefferson]
  • Considerations on the nature and the extent of the legislative authority of the British Parliament. Philadelphia, 1774
  • [James Wilson]
  • A letter from Freeman of South-Carolina, to the deputies of North-America, assembled in the High Court of Congress at Philadelphia. Charleston, 1774
  • [William Henry Drayton]
  • Some fugitive thoughts on a letter signed Freeman, addressed to the deputies, assembled at the High Court of Congress in Philadelphia. Charleston, 1774
Dimensions
21 cm.
Extent
xxii, 954 pages
Isbn
9781598533781
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other control number
9781598533781
System control number
  • ocn895301621
  • (OCoLC)895301621
Label
The American Revolution : writings from the pamphlet debate, II, 1773-1776, Gordon S. Wood, editor
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • A letter from a Virginian, to the members of the Congress to be held at Philadelphia, on the first of September, 1774. New York, 1774
  • [Jonathan Boucher?]
  • The Congress canvassed: or, an examination into the conduct of the delegates, at their grand convention, held in Philadelphia, Sept. 1, 1774. Addressed, to the merchants of New-York. New York, 1774
  • [Samuel Seabury]
  • A friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on the subject of our political confusions: in which the necessary consequences of violently opposing the King's troops, and of a general non-importation are fairly stated. New York, 1774
  • [Thomas Bradbury Chandler]
  • The other side of the question: or, a defence of the liberties of North-America. In answer to a late friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on the subject of our political confusions. New York, 1774
  • [Philip Livingston]
  • "An appendix, stating the heavy grievances the colonies labour under from several late Acts of the British Parliament, and shewing what we have just reason to expect the consequences of these measures will be." From Samuel Sherwood, A sermon containing, scriptural instructions to civil rulers, and all free-born subjects. New haven, 1774
  • Ebenezer Baldwin
  • The speeches of His Excellency Governor Hutchinson, to the General Assembly of the Massachusetts-Bay. At a session begun and held on the sixth of January, 1773. With the answers of His Majesty's Council and the House of Representatives respectively. Boston, 1773
  • Strictures on a pamphlet, entitled, a "Friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on the subject of our political confusions." Addressed to the people of America. The second edition. New London, 1775
  • [Charles Lee]
  • The strictures on the friendly address examined, and a refutation of its principles attempted. Addressed to the people of America. Boston, 1775
  • [Henry Barry]
  • A candid examination of the mutual claims of Great-Britain, and the colonies: with a plan of accommodation, on constitutional principles. New York, 1775
  • [Joseph Galloway]
  • Taxation no tyranny; an answer to the resolutions and address of the American Congress. London, 1775
  • [Samuel Johnson]
  • An answer to a pamphlet, entitled taxation no tyranny. Addressed to the author, and to persons in power. London, 1775
  • The speech of Edmund Burke, Esquire, on moving his resolutions for conciliation with the colonies, March 22d, 1775. New York, 1775
  • A summary view of the rights of British America. Set forth in some resolutions intended for the inspection of the present delegates of the people of Virginia. Now in convention. Williamsburg, 1774
  • Edmund Burke
  • America's appeal to the impartial world. Hartford, 1775
  • [Moses Mather]
  • Common sense; addressed to the inhabitants of America ... A new edition, with several additions in the body of the work. To which is added an appendix; together with an address to the people called Quakers. Philadelphia, 1776
  • [Thomas Paine] --The true interest of America impartially stated, in certain strictures on a pamphlet intitled Common Sense. Philadelphia, 1776
  • [Charles Inglis]
  • Strictures upon the Declaration of the Congress at Philadelphia; in a letter to a noble lord &c. London, 1776
  • [Thomas Hutchinson]
  • [Thomas Jefferson]
  • Considerations on the nature and the extent of the legislative authority of the British Parliament. Philadelphia, 1774
  • [James Wilson]
  • A letter from Freeman of South-Carolina, to the deputies of North-America, assembled in the High Court of Congress at Philadelphia. Charleston, 1774
  • [William Henry Drayton]
  • Some fugitive thoughts on a letter signed Freeman, addressed to the deputies, assembled at the High Court of Congress in Philadelphia. Charleston, 1774
Dimensions
21 cm.
Extent
xxii, 954 pages
Isbn
9781598533781
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other control number
9781598533781
System control number
  • ocn895301621
  • (OCoLC)895301621

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